Building Professional Excellence

NBCC Foundation has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 805. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. NBCC Foundation is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs.


Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Approaches for Working With Clients Who Are Angry at God

Therapists often have to walk a fine line when working with clients whose presenting concerns or underlying issues involve matters of religious or spiritual anger. The client’s history in these areas can be laden with issues of grief, loss, blame, fear, doubt and pain, leading to situational depression and anxiety. The delicate issues of spirituality, religion or faith can be very personal and, for many clients, the notion of anger at a Transcendent Being is loaded with taboo, guilt and shame.

This presentation uses a model developed by Baylor University researchers Paul Froese and Christopher Bader and their comprehensive survey of Americans’ religious beliefs. The model allows individuals to identify their “God type” and explore ways in which that “God type” is consistent or inconsistent with their experience. When dissonance exists between a client’s experience and their expectations, it often brings up questions of justice and forgiveness, especially when trauma is involved.

The therapist must have the self-awareness of their own history and personal beliefs to join the client in the therapeutic process without crossing boundaries or denying their own possible countertransference. This presentation is designed to help therapists address the sensitive issues of religious anger in an ethical and supportive manner using cognitive behavioral interventions to assist the client in determining and meeting their goals. The workshop approaches this topic as a matter of cultural sensitivity and cultural competence. Therapists will learn how to effectively explore the central concerns and relevant history of a client’s spiritual or religious doubt, fear and pain. The goal is to help clinicians improve treatment outcomes when working with clients whose anger is related to issues of faith.

OBJECTIVES:

  1. Improve treatment outcomes when working with clients whose anger is related to spiritual or religious issues.
  2. Boundary setting for the ethical care of clients whose presenting or underlying concerns are of a spiritual or religious nature.
  3. Effectively explore the central concerns and relevant history of spiritual or religious doubt, fear and pain.

LaVerne Hanes Stevens, NCC, LPC, MAC, BCC, DCC, ACS

LaVerne Stevens is a Licensed Professional Counselor, Master Addictions Counselor and Certified Professional Clinical Supervisor with 20 years experience as a National Certified Counselor. LaVerne earned her bachelor of science degree from Syracuse University. She has her M.S.Ed. in community counseling from Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, and she did her doctoral studies in Christian counseling at South Florida Bible College and Theological Seminary. She has worked in public, private and parish settings in the roles of counselor, clinical trainer, clinical supervisor and executive director for mental health and substance abuse programs. In her private practice for the past six years, she used her expertise to help clients develop whole-life (bio-psycho-social-spiritual) responses to the problems they face.

Dr. Hanes Stevens is a trainer, speaker and author. Her publications include numerous cover feature articles for Counselor magazine; a published textbook chapter on clinical assessment in Lowinson and Ruiz’s Substance Abuse: A Comprehensive Textbook; and her book, The Fruit of Your Pain: Experiencing Spiritual Renewal Through Seasons of Struggle.

Identity, Trauma, Culture and History: Understanding the Dynamics of Counseling African Americans (Part 2) - Skills and Strategies

This webinar explores skills, strategies and techniques counselors can use to more effectively engage African-American clients in the counseling process. It focuses on: (1) a practical strategy/exercise counselors can use to prepare for working with African-American clients, (2) understanding the cultural sensitivity of theories and/or approaches, and (3) identifying appropriate evidence-based theories and/or approaches that promote positive outcomes among African-American clients.

At the end of the webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Identify and discuss two methods counselors can use to prepare for working with African-American clients.
  • Define culturally sensitive counseling intervention strategies.
  • List and describe at least three factors used to determine appropriate theories and/or approaches for working with African-American clients.
  • Identify and discuss at least three theories and/or approaches that are effective for working with African American clients.

Robert A. Horne, Ph.D., NCC, ACS, LPC, LCAS, CSI

Robert A. Horne is assistant professor of counselor education in the Department of Allied Professions at North Carolina Central University. Additionally, Dr. Horne serves as a counselor and counseling consultant in private practice, as chair of the NBCC Foundation Minority Fellowship Program (MFP) Doctoral Advisory Council, and as a subject matter expert for the International Credentialing and Reciprocity Consortium.

Dr. Horne holds a Ph.D. in counseling and counselor education from North Carolina State University, an M. A. in agency counseling from North Carolina Central University, and Master of Divinity from Duke University. He is a National Certified Counselor, Approved Clinical Supervisor, licensed professional counselor, licensed clinical addiction specialist, certified clinical supervisor intern, and International Certified Advanced Alcohol and Drug Counselor. Dr. Horne is a 2013 NBCC MFP Fellow.

Dr. Horne resides in Durham, North Carolina, and has visited over 40 countries. He conducts workshops and trainings both nationally and internationally. He is actively engaged with mental health and substance abuse organizations in Africa and the Caribbean to develop mental health and substance use programs for underserved communities.

Q & A

Suicide Grief: The Ultimate Rejection

Suicide is the l0th leading cause of death in the United States with one completed every 13 minutes. Each day, 117 people complete suicide. It is estimated that for each suicide death there are 6–10 loved ones, or survivors, left behind whose lives are forever impacted by that death. Survivors of suicide represent “the largest mental health casualties related to suicide” (Edwin Shneidman, PhD, American Association of Suicidology Founding President).

Suicide grief is different than most other types of grief and involves intense emotions such as grief, blame, rage and stigma. Survivors feel isolated and judged. Many feel overwhelmed by their emotions, and loved ones feel at a loss as to how to help.

At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the aftermath of suicide
  • Understand how suicide grief differs from other kinds of grief
  • Describe how to help facilitate suicide grief in clinical settings
  • Identify resources to best help clients who are survivors

Mary E. Jones, Ed.D., NCC, LPC, LMFT

Mary E. Jones has over 30 years of experience in both counselor education and clinical practice. She has worked in private practice, public agency, hospital and college settings. Her areas of expertise are in resiliency, relationships, anxiety and depression, grief, and women’s health. She is licensed as both a professional counselor and a marriage and family therapist in the state of South Dakota.

Dr. Jones has bachelor’s degrees in public relations and human geography and a master’s degree in counseling and human resource development from South Dakota State University. She has a doctorate in counseling and psychology in education from the University of South Dakota.

Dr. Jones currently resides in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, and is a consultant as well as an adjunct faculty member for Capella University in the Master’s in Mental Health Counseling program. Her interest and experience in resiliency has led her to present at both national and international venues.

Q & A

Identity, Trauma, Culture and History: Understanding the Dynamics of Counseling African Americans

This webinar explores psychological, historical, cultural and contextual factors that influence African Americans’ self and world schemas. Additionally, this webinar will address approaches that can be used to facilitate (1) understanding how African Americans’ self and world schemas influence the counseling process and counseling outcomes, (2) building therapeutic alliances between African Americans and mental health professionals, and (3) increasing African Americans’ participation in and completion of counseling engagements.

During this session, participants will:

  • Identify and discuss significant elements that compose African Americans’ core values.
  • List and describe at least three factors that shape African-American self and world schemas.
  • Define the term “cultural trauma and collective identity” and discuss how it impacts African Americans’ engagement in the counseling process and counseling outcomes.
  • Identify and discuss African Americans’ traditional views of counseling.
  • List and discuss at least three approaches that are effective for building therapeutic alliances with African Americans.
  • Identify and discuss at least three approaches that can be used to increase African Americans’ participation in and completion of therapeutic services.

Robert A. Horne, Ph.D., NCC, ACS, LPC, LCAS, CSI

Robert A. Horne is assistant professor of counselor education in the Department of Allied Professions at North Carolina Central University. Additionally, Dr. Horne serves as a counselor and counseling consultant in private practice, as chair of the NBCC Foundation Minority Fellowship Program (MFP) Doctoral Advisory Council, and as a subject matter expert for the International Credentialing and Reciprocity Consortium.

Dr. Horne holds a Ph.D. in counseling and counselor education from North Carolina State University, an M. A. in agency counseling from North Carolina Central University, and Master of Divinity from Duke University. He is a National Certified Counselor, Approved Clinical Supervisor, licensed professional counselor, licensed clinical addiction specialist, certified clinical supervisor intern, and International Certified Advanced Alcohol and Drug Counselor. Dr. Horne is a 2013 NBCC MFP Fellow.

Dr. Horne’s research and publications focus on identity development and sustenance of males of African descent; the relationship between spirituality, mental health and substance use; stress and coping strategies; and the development of professional and paraprofessional counselor training and supervision in international settings among underserved populations.

Dr. Horne resides in Durham, North Carolina, and has visited over 40 countries. He conducts workshops and trainings both nationally and internationally. He is actively engaged with mental health and substance abuse organizations in Africa and the Caribbean to develop mental health and substance use programs for underserved communities.

Q & A

Using Mindfulness Techniques to Treat Eating Disorders

Treatment of eating disorders poses unique challenges for providers. Western mental health has become increasingly interested in using the Buddhist practice of mindfulness as a means of therapeutic change. This presentation looks at the role of mindfulness in treating eating disorders as part of a comprehensive treatment paradigm.

During this webinar, participants will learn about:

  • The core qualities of mindfulness.
  • The healing potential of mindfulness.
  • Bulimia nervosa, anorexia nervosa and binge-eating disorder.
  • The typical treatment modalities for eating disorders.
  • Mindfulness-based treatments including mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) and cognitive emotional behavioral therapy for eating disorders (CEBT-ED).
  • Specific mindfulness treatment techniques.

Marty Slyter, Ph.D., NCC, LMHC, LPC

Marty Slyter has over 30 years of experience as a professional counselor, having worked in youth corrections, the public school system and a community college counseling center. She has been a counselor educator since 1999. Dr. Slyter has taught in both school counseling and mental health counseling programs in addition to serving as coordinator of two school counseling training programs and program director for an entire graduate counseling program. She is a licensed mental health counselor in Washington and a licensed professional counselor in Colorado.

Dr. Slyter has a bachelor’s degree in theater and communications education from the University of Colorado-Boulder; a master’s degree in psychology, counseling and guidance from the University of Northern Colorado; and a doctorate in counselor education and supervision from the University of Northern Colorado.

Dr. Slyter currently resides in Westminster, Colorado, and is core faculty at Walden University in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Clinical Mental Health Counseling Program. She is the primary lead faculty for the program’s multicultural counseling courses. Her professional areas of interest are effective treatment of eating disorders, adolescent issues, art therapy techniques and counselor wellness.

Discussion

Neurobiology of Counseling: Application and Interventions for Clinicians

In this webinar, participants will learn basic neurobiological principles that underlie human development and behavior; how to connect these principles to counseling practice; and specific counseling interventions supported by neuroscience research that support client/student learning, growth and well-being.

At the end of this session, attendees will be able to:

  • Describe at least two basic structural mechanisms of the brain that impact human functioning.
  • Discuss the synergy that exists between neurobiology principles and counseling practice.
  • Describe at least two specific ways to apply neurobiology principles to counseling practice.
  • Describe at least two neuroscience-supported interventions or strategies to use with clients or students to improve counseling or learning outcomes.

Kathy Shoemaker, M.A., Ed.S., NCC, ACS, LPC, CPS

Kathy Shoemaker is a licensed professional counselor and school counselor in New Jersey, as well as a National Certified Counselor (NCC) and Approved Clinical Supervisor (ACS). As a doctoral candidate at Montclair State University in the Counselor Education program, she is focused on the synergistic relationship between neuroscience, counseling and learning and the implications for clients and students. She has trained in interpersonal neurobiology through the Mindsight Institute.

For two decades, Ms. Shoemaker has worked with children and adolescents in school and community settings promoting healthy developmental trajectories. As a prevention specialist and school counselor, she teaches brain-based concepts and uses mindfulness interventions with students individually, in groups and in the classroom to help overcome academic, behavioral and emotional obstacles to feeling successfully engaged in school. In her work at an intensive outpatient substance abuse program for adolescent clients and their families, Ms. Shoemaker incorporated neuroscience into the psychoeducational component of treatment to support client self-awareness. Most recently, she has integrated neuroscience research into the counseling courses she teaches and has presented on neuroscience and mindfulness in a variety of forums to support neuro-informed counseling. Ms. Shoemaker will teach in Rider University’s counseling program starting fall of 2016.

Q & A

Counseling LGBTQQ+ Partners: Supporting Resilience and Empowerment

In this webinar, attendees will explore the theoretical perspectives undergirding affirmative counseling with LGBTQQ+ partners. These perspectives are intricately related to the values of the counseling field, including multiculturalism, social justice, strengths-based, empowerment, and resilience approaches. Participants will learn about the historical and contemporary influences on the lives of LGBTQQ+ partners, and the various identities and relational structures that support their lives. Attendees will learn how to explore their own assumptions about LGBTQQ+ partners, as well as how to create empowering spaces for LGBTQQ+ partners both within and outside of the counseling session

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the counseling theoretical approaches most affirming for LGBTQQ+ partners.
  • List at least three protective factors for LGBTQQ+ partners.
  • Describe at least three risk factors for LGBTQQ+ partners.
  • Detail the major advocacy concerns when working with LGBTQQ+ partners.
  • Identify their own attitudes and assumptions about LGBTQQ+ partners.

Anneliese A. Singh, Ph.D., LPC, NCC

Anneliese A. Singh is an associate professor in the Department of Counseling and Human Development Services and program coordinator of the Counseling and Student Personnel Services doctoral program at the University of Georgia. Dr. Singh is past president of the Association for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Issues in Counseling (ALGBTIC) where her presidential initiatives included the development of counseling competencies for working with transgender clients in counseling, supporting queer people of color, and ensuring safe schools for LGBTQQ+ youth.

Dr. Singh is a cofounder of the Georgia Safe Schools Coalition, an organization that works at the intersection of heterosexism, racism, sexism, and other oppressions to create safe school environments in Georgia, and has been honored with more than 11 national awards for her work in community-building. She also founded the Trans Resilience Project to translate findings from her over 10 years of research on the resilience that transgender people develop to navigate societal oppression. She is a co-primary investigator on a multi-site (Atlanta, New York, San Francisco) longitudinal study investigating transgender identity development, risk, and resilience, funded by the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Singh actively works on being a better ally to transgender people and developing empowering spaces for people of color who have survived sexual abuse, and has worked on initiatives to end child sexual abuse in South Asian/Indian communities. Dr. Singh is a Sikh American and passionately believes in and strives to live by the ideals of Dr. King’s beloved community, as well as Audre Lorde’s quote: “Without community, there is no liberation.”

Q & A

Boundaries and Power Differentials in Helping Relationships

Boundaries in the therapeutic process are like boundaries in any relationship. Some are clear and straightforward, while others can often become blurred. This webinar will shed light on boundaries that are ethically required for the welfare of both the client and clinician while at the same time point out that therapy is an intimate process in which there is a balance of power that must be acknowledged and respected.

In this session, participants will:

  • Learn the importance of power differentials in the counseling relationship.
  • Learn how the office environment can contribute to subconscious power positions.
  • Learn how to use their titles to establish power.
  • Learn why the first few sentences of therapy set the stage for positions of power.
  • Learn how body language contributes to subconscious power messages.
  • Understand the importance of cultural power differentials (gender, age, appearance).
  • Discover their personal feelings about “power” in order to understand the power differential in the helping profession.
  • Learn how replacing power with knowledge and experience can often help to neutralize a dangerous situation.

Donna Dannenfelser, Ed.D., NCC, MAC

Dr. Donna Dannenfelser received her master’s in counseling from Hofstra University before receiving her Ph.D. and Ed.D. from Long Island University and Dowling College, respectively. Dr. Dannenfelser has a unique career journey as a counselor; she worked for the New York Jets and even had a TV show based on her life. Necessary Roughness, the USA Network drama, ended its three-season run in November 2013 with an average of four million viewers. During this time, it earned accolades, including a 2012 Golden Globe nomination for star Callie Thorne, and the Voice Award for raising mental health awareness. It drew recognition for tackling controversial subjects drawn from the real world of professional sports, including illegal performance-enhancing drugs and gay athletes.

The show centered around Dr. Donna’s unique role as the first female mental health clinician to bring hypnotherapy to an NFL team in the 90s. She has been the subject of frequent profiles, both during the show’s run and her years with the New York Jets.

Dr. Donna regularly appears as an expert guest on television news programs. She was featured on The Dr. Oz Show, where she spoke about positive thoughts and how they keep us healthy. She has also joined Regis Philbin on ESPN’s Crowd Goes Wild, on which she spoke about athletes and their reliance on superstitions. She is the featured therapist on Flipping Out, with Jeff Lewis. She is also a sports correspondent to TMZ Sports, Bloomberg News, and Today. She is a frequent contributor to the Huffington Post.

Dr. Donna is the author of the international bestselling Game On!: What I learned During My Time As The Shrink To the NY Jets – How To Achieve Anything You Want In Life! Dr. Donna is currently a keynote speaker and has her private practice in Encino, California.

Q & A

Preventing Child and Adolescent Suicide: Skills Application

This webinar will provide beginning and experienced counselors with the information they need to begin the prevention and crisis-management process when working with a potentially suicidal client. In addition, information about how to facilitate postvention efforts with the survivors of attempts and completions will be provided.

The objectives of this session are:

  • To discuss approaches to prevention to reduce the risk of suicide attempts and completions.
  • To provide mental health counselors with the information they need for crisis management after a suicide attempt or completion.
  • To provide mental health counselors and other professionals with the information they need for postvention after suicide attempt or completion.

David Capuzzi, Ph.D., NCC, LPC

David Capuzzi is a graduate of Florida State University and licensed as a counselor in Oregon. He is certified by the National Board for Certified Counselors as a National Certified Counselor. Currently, Dr. Capuzzi is a core faculty member in the clinical mental health counseling degree program in counselor education and supervision at Walden University as well as a senior faculty associate in the Department of Counseling and Human Services at Johns Hopkins University. He is professor emeritus at Portland State University, in Portland, Oregon. From 2007–2009, he served as affiliate professor at Pennsylvania State University. He is past president of the American Counseling Association (ACA).

A frequent keynote and workshop presenter at professional conferences and institutes, Dr. Capuzzi has also consulted with a variety of school districts and community agencies on initiating prevention and intervention strategies for adolescents at risk for suicide. He has facilitated the development of suicide prevention, crisis management and postvention programs in communities throughout the United States; provides training on the topics of youth at risk, grief and loss, group work and other topics; and serves as an invited adjunct faculty member at other universities as time permits. He is the first recipient of ACA's Kitty Cole Human Rights Award and a recipient of the Leona Tyler Award in Oregon. He was inducted as an ACA fellow in 2008, and was the 2010 recipient of ACA’s Kathleen and Gilbert Wrenn Award for a Humanitarian and Caring Person. In 2011, he was named a Distinguished Alumnus by the College of Education at Florida State University.

Dr. Capuzzi has co-authored or co-edited 10 textbooks used in counselor education programs.

Q & A

Treating Trauma With Dialectical Behavior Therapy

While most often associated with the treatment of borderline personality disorder, dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) has been shown to be effective in treating several other conditions with aspects of emotional dysregulation, interpersonal problems and maladaptive coping. This webinar will show clinicians how the principles and techniques of DBT can be used to treat clients struggling with the effects of trauma.

By the end of this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss how trauma can lead to problems with emotion regulation, interpersonal relationships, identity development and behavioral control.
  • Describe the three-phase model of treatment for trauma.
  • Identify the core components of dialectical behavior therapy.
  • Accurately identify the four modules taught in the skills training component of DBT.
  • Discuss how DBT Skills can be applied within the three-phase treatment approach to trauma.

Cynthia Miller, Ph.D., LPC

Cynthia Miller is a licensed professional counselor (LPC) with over 15 years of experience providing individual and group counseling to adults in institutional, community and forensic settings. She received her B.A. in psychology and political science from Alma College and completed her M.Ed. in counseling in higher education and her Ph.D. in counselor education and supervision at the University of Virginia. Dr. Miller is assistant professor and clinical coordinator at South University–Richmond.

Dr. Miller began her counseling career working with women in a domestic violence shelter, where she began learning about trauma. She later worked in a women’s prison, where she learned about the complex interplay between trauma, addiction and mental illness. While there, she received training in dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) and developed a modified DBT program for the facility. Her dissertation explored the common practices of supervisors providing supervision for licensure and provided a blueprint for practicing clinicians providing supervision to licensure candidates.

Dr. Miller's clinical interests include complex trauma, borderline personality disorder, clinical supervision and psychopharmacology, and she has presented on these topics at the state, regional and national levels. Dr. Miller resides in Charlottesville, Virginia, where she maintains a small private practice. She welcomes opportunities for collaboration and is always happy to hear from colleagues in the field.

Therapeutic Approaches to Trauma—Part 2: Interventions

In this webinar, participants will learn specific interventions to use with clients to manage dissociation, prevent retraumatization, and help heal in each of the three phases of trauma-informed care. These phases are: (1) establish safety and stabilization; (2) reprocess traumatic memories; and (3) reconnect to a healthy sense of self, relationships and the world. Moreover, participants will learn creative strategies to empower and uplift clients and to make new meanings that fit within their cultural, spiritual and family values.

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe at least two interventions to establish safety and stabilization with traumatized clients.
  • Describe at least two interventions to help clients reprocess traumatic memories without abreacting or dissociating.
  • Describe at least two interventions to help clients reconnect to a healthy sense of self, relationships and the world.
  • Discuss the role of meaning-making after trauma and how to collaborate with the client to work within his or her cultural, spiritual and family values.

Courtney Armstrong, M.Ed., NCC, LPC

Courtney Armstrong is a licensed professional counselor in Tennessee and a National Certified Counselor (NCC) who specializes in grief and trauma recovery. With a career spanning more than two decades, she owns and directs Tamarisk Counseling Center, in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and has helped thousands of clients overcome trauma, grief and anxiety, and experience deep personal transformation. Ms. Armstrong also offers face-to-face and online training to mental health professionals, showing them how to help their clients to clear underlying trauma that may be affecting their health, their relationships and their lives in general. Her professional expertise has made her a much sought-after media guest, appearing on CBS Radio News, NPR, Shrink Rap Radio and The Trauma Therapist Podcast, among others. Ms. Armstrong has also contributed to professional publications such as Psychotherapy Networker, The Neuropsychotherapist and Counseling Today, and is the author of Transforming Traumatic Grief (2011) and her latest book, The Therapeutic “Aha!”: 10 Strategies for Getting Your Clients Unstuck (2015).

Q & A

Family-Inclusive Substance Abuse Counseling for Racial and Ethnic Minorities

Family involvement is becoming increasing popular and vital in substance abuse treatment. Empowering family members to support each other and their loved ones and to advocate for addiction and recovery needs is a vital part of a family counselor’s role in substance abuse treatment.

Counselors must be cognizant of the differences between themselves and the people that they are serving as well as differences within clients’ families. Counselors have their own cultural biases, and unawareness of these may impeded the progress of the client and their family members. Family-inclusive substance abuse counseling requires awareness of various culturally specific norms for racial and ethnic minorities in order to increase service effectiveness.

During this session, participants will learn:

  • What the Addiction Counseling Competencies state regarding family involvement and diversity.
  • Cultural factors that may influence working with certain families in substance abuse treatment.
  • The personal, environmental and sociopolitical context of clients who are culturally different.
  • About the significance family members assign to their own identities in relation to the therapist.
  • How to promote sensitivity to cultural differences of familial groups being counseled concerning substance abuse.

Asha Dickerson, Ph.D., NCC, LPC

Asha Dickerson is a professor in the Counseling Department at Argosy University Atlanta. She is a National Certified Counselor and a licensed professional counselor in Georgia. Dr. Dickerson is a native of Montgomery, Alabama, and alumna of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, where she received bachelor’s and master’s degrees. She received her Ph.D. in counselor education and supervision from Auburn University. Dr. Dickerson was an inaugural fellow of the NBCC Foundation Minority Fellowship Program.

Prior to entering academia, Dr. Dickerson served as the family and community service coordinator for Fellowship House, Inc., a private, nonprofit, substance abuse recovery program designed to serve the special needs of individuals who suffer from alcoholism or drug addiction and other mental illnesses. While in this position, she created and expanded multiple programs to enrich the lives of individuals who have family members suffering with substance addiction.

Dr. Dickerson is very active in several community, state and national organizations and currently serves as secretary for the Association of Multicultural Counseling and Development and chair of the NBCC Minority Fellowship Program Advisory Council. Her clinical and academic specialties include social and cultural diversity and counseling addicted families.

Q & A

Responding to Subpoenas and Requests for Court Appearances

Some counselors serve as expert witnesses as a part of their practice. Counselor experts are paid to give their opinions regarding issues such as child custody, evaluations of the mental or physical status of individuals related to work, and professional and ethical conduct. Counselors who do not serve as expert witnesses sometimes are asked by clients to appear in court as fact witnesses on their behalf or receive subpoenas to appear in court.

Many counselors want to avoid appearing in court except as compensated expert witnesses. Counselor and attorney Dr. Theodore Remley will explain why counselors should avoid court appearances when possible. Appropriate responses when subpoenas are received and effective responses when clients ask counselors to appear in their court will be provided. The speaker also will give participants advice on how to conduct themselves when compelled to appear in court.

At the conclusion of the webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the difference between expert witnesses and fact witnesses.
  • List situations in which counselors often appear in court for a fee as expert witnesses.
  • List situations in which clients request counselors to appear in court as fact witnesses.
  • List situations in which counselors might receive subpoenas to appear in court.
  • Respond appropriately when asked by a client to appear in court as a fact witness.
  • Take the proper steps upon receiving a subpoena to appear in court.
  • Discuss how counselors should conduct themselves when they are required to appear in court as fact witnesses.

Theodore P. Remley Jr., Ph.D., J.D., NCC, LPC

Theodore P. Remley Jr. is a professor of counseling at Our Lady of Holy Cross College in New Orleans. He is a National Certified Counselor (NCC) and a member of Chi Sigma Iota, the international counseling honor society. He is licensed as a professional counselor in Virginia, Louisiana and Mississippi, and is licensed to practice law in Virginia and Florida. Dr. Remley holds a Ph.D. in counselor education from the University of Florida and a law degree (J.D.) from Catholic University, in Washington, DC.Dr. Remley is the author or coauthor of a number of articles, books and book chapters related to legal and ethical issues in counseling. He has worked with NBCC-International to offer counseling institutes in Bhutan, Argentina, Ireland and Malawi. Dr. Remley has held full-time counseling faculty positions at George Mason University, Mississippi State University, the University of New Orleans and Old Dominion University. Dr. Remley is former executive director and a fellow of the American Counseling Association (ACA). He received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision.

Q & A

Adolescent Grief: Developmental and Cultural Considerations

Grief, the multifaceted response to significant loss, affects individuals across the lifespan. Fortunately, research focusing on this area is burgeoning; however, much of it centers on adult grief, potentially leaving adolescent mourners disenfranchised and misunderstood. Adolescent grief is uniquely impacted by factors such as cognitive, emotional, and psychosocial development; risks and protective factors; embeddedness within multiple contexts, such as school, family and neighborhood; societal messages about who is allowed to mourn and in what ways; and family culture. Counselors working with adolescents need to understand the unique characteristics of adolescent grief, its influences, and ways to help facilitate healthy coping.

During this session, participants will learn:

  • How the developmental context of adolescence intersects with grief to create a unique, specific response to loss
  • How adolescents’ family culture impacts their experience and expression of grief.
  • Other factors influencing adolescent grief (e.g., wider societal messages about grief and embeddedness within multiple contexts).
  • Roles counselors can play in facilitating adaptive coping and positive meaning-making for grieving adolescents.

Laura S. Wheat, Ph.D., NCC, LPC

Laura S. Wheat is assistant professor of counselor education at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. She coordinates the college’s Grief Outreach Initiative (GOI), a service learning opportunity for any student enrolled in the university, graduate or undergraduate, to provide one-on-one support and mentorship to a grieving K–12 student in the local school system. She is currently conducting outcome research on GOI activities and is working to implement a grief camp for children and adolescents. Dr. Wheat has worked as a school counselor in York, South Carolina, in addition to teaching in the counselor education programs at Winthrop University, in Rock Hill, South Carolina, and Augusta University, in Georgia. She has presented and published on grieving children and adolescents for the past nine years. She currently serves as a member of the board of directors of the Association for Death Education and Counseling (ADEC).

Q & A

Therapeutic Approaches to Trauma

Surprising neuroscience discoveries have revealed the key to resolving traumatic memories and are changing the way therapists treat trauma. In this webinar, participants will get up to date on these exciting brain science discoveries. Attendees will learn the three-phase model of trauma-informed treatment and a simple five-step process to help clients safely and painlessly resolve traumatic memories.

During this session, participants will learn:

  • Why exposure techniques alone are not enough to relieve post-traumatic stress and reconsolidate traumatic memories.
  • The three phases of trauma-informed treatment.
  • The five-step process that all effective trauma therapies have in common and how to use it to safely and painlessly reconsolidate traumatic memories.
  • One example of how to creatively heal traumatic memories using imagery, storytelling, music or movement.

Courtney Armstrong, M.Ed., NCC, LPC

Courtney Armstrong is a licensed professional counselor in Tennessee and a National Certified Counselor (NCC) who specializes in grief and trauma recovery. With a career spanning more than two decades, she owns and directs Tamarisk Counseling Center, in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and has helped thousands of clients overcome trauma, grief and anxiety, and experience deep personal transformation. Ms. Armstrong also offers face-to-face and online training to mental health professionals, showing them how to help their clients to clear underlying trauma that may be affecting their health, their relationships and their lives in general. Her professional expertise has made her a much sought-after media guest, appearing on CBS Radio News, NPR, Shrink Rap Radio and The Trauma Therapist Podcast, among others. Ms. Armstrong has also contributed to professional publications such as Psychotherapy Networker, The Neuropsychotherapist and Counseling Today, and is the author of Transforming Traumatic Grief (2011) and her latest book, The Therapeutic “Aha!”: 10 Strategies for Getting Your Clients Unstuck (2015).

Q & ADiscussion

Identifying and Treating Gambling Addiction

This session will cover the epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of pathological gambling.

During this session, participants will learn about:

  • The biopsychosocial nature of problem gambling.
  • Risk factors associated with pathological gambling.
  • Effective interventions with problem gambling.
  • Special populations with gambling problems.
  • Special considerations with problem gambling.

Oscar Flores Sida, M.S., NCC, LCPC, LCADC, CPGC

Oscar Flores Sida is a bilingual mental health and addictions counselor, native to Las Vegas, Nevada. He is a National Certified Counselor (NCC), licensed clinical professional counselor, licensed alcohol and drug counselor, and certified problem gambling counselor. Currently, he holds a position as a full-time faculty member and program coordinator for human services in the Department of Education and Clinical Studies at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), where he teaches in the area of addictive disorders and mental health. Mr. Sida is the clinical supervisor at “The Practice,” a community mental health clinic at UNLV, and works in private practice as a mental health and substance abuse counselor. He has specialized in the treatment of process addictions and psychological trauma for the past five years and worked extensively with clients suffering from problem gambling and related issues. He has been featured in television and film for his expertise in the area of gambling and has presented as a speaker at national conferences. Mr. Sida holds a Master of Science degree in clinical mental health counseling and a Bachelor of Science in psychology, both from UNLV.

Q & ADiscussion

Using Play Therapy for Affect Regulation

This workshop will demonstrate how to identify and treat dysregulated and traumatized children. A model for structuring play therapy sessions will be presented. Somatosensory play activities, water/mud trays, EMDR, feeding and emotional attunement are some recommended play activities that can help this population repattern the lower regions of the brain and prepare for more traditional psychodynamic or cognitive behavioral therapies.

During this session, participants will:

  • Learn what affect regulation means.
  • Learn how to identify affect dysregulation.
  • Learn different play therapy activities to help a dysregulated child.

Heloisa Portela, Ph.D., NCC, ACS, LPCS

Heloisa Portela started as a clinical psychologist in Brazil before becoming a licensed professional counselor supervisor (LPCS) in North Carolina, where she is a private practitioner and professor. She is a National Certified Counselor and an Approved Clinical Supervisor. Dr. Portela is past president of the North Carolina Association for Play Therapy and a former Play Therapy Magazine reviewer. She is currently an APT Conference Program Committee member and International Journal of Play Therapy reviewer. Working with attachment-disordered children and their families is one of her specialties. She also teaches graduate play therapy classes at North Carolina Central University.

Q & ADiscussion

The Science of Well-Being: Positive Psychology Strategies for Increasing Meaning and Achievement

This webinar will explore meaning and achievement, two of the pillars of positive psychology. Research has demonstrated that a subjective sense of meaning is strongly correlated with happiness. Meaning includes using one’s best qualities to belong to and serve something bigger (the larger world and society), connection to positive institutions (e.g., religion, politics, family and community), a future focus, altruism, and the like. Achievement, or accomplishment, occurs over a lifetime and includes competence, mastery and development of new skills.

Participants in this webinar will learn practical strategies that can be used with clients or as personal tools to strengthen engagement and relationships as a means of improving quality of life. The examples offered are applicable to educational, military, behavioral health and social service settings.

At the end of the session, the participant will be able to:

  • Describe two forms of meaning that are associated with well-being.
  • Identify two strategies to increase meaning.
  • Describe how achievement can increase well-being.

Bob Bertolino, Ph.D., NCC, LPC

Bob Bertolino is associate professor of rehabilitation counseling at Maryville University, senior clinical advisor at Youth In Need, Inc. and senior associate for the International Center for Clinical Excellence. He has taught more than 400 workshops throughout the United States and 11 countries and authored or coauthored 14 books, including The Therapist’s Notebook on Positive Psychology: Activities, Exercises, and Handouts; Strengths-Based Engagement and Practice: Creating Effective Helping Relationships; and Thriving on the Front Lines: Strengths-Based Youth Care Work. Dr. Bertolino is licensed as a marital and family therapist and professional counselor in the state of Missouri and is a National Certified Counselor.

Q & ADiscussion

Living With What I've Done: Navigating Moral Injury with ACT and Forgiveness Exercises (Part 2)

Upon returning from active duty, service members can experience a host of challenges. Be it reintegrating with loved ones, recalibrating to life outside the combat zone, or struggling with such things as moral injury or self-medicating behaviors, these individuals often have difficulty reaching out for help. Given the military culture of strength, honor and self-discipline, the idea of admitting to a problem is often foreign, which might result in their avoiding treatment. The internalized shame and guilt over actions taken under fire can lead to the phenomenon of moral injury. Increasingly acknowledged as the signature wound of this generation of veterans, moral injury has been likened to a bruise on the soul, leading to lasting impacts on individuals and their families.

Although the development of informed treatment options for moral injury is in its infancy, one option that warrants consideration is acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT). Using mindfulness techniques and self-forgiveness exercises, ACT helps clients to move past their suffering by targeting shame and avoidance behaviors and teaching them to be psychologically flexible—to “live with” what occurred rather than trying to eliminate reality. Presented by a combat-experienced Marine, this two-part webinar will offer the necessary tools to help clinicians implement ACT and forgiveness strategies for their clients who are experiencing moral injury. Part 1 will examine moral injury and the basic tenets of ACT, and Part 2 will explore various mindfulness techniques and self-forgiveness exercises to use with those struggling with moral injury.

In Part 2 of this two-part webinar attendees will learn and explore ways to address moral injury through:

  • Various ACT techniques;
  • Self-forgiveness exercises; and
  • Mindfulness techniques.

Additional topics include:

  • Integration strategies with other helping philosophies; and
  • Challenges of using forgiveness activities in various settings.

Bryce Hagedorn, Ph.D., NCC, MAC, LMHC

Bryce Hagedorn is a National Certified Counselor, a Master Addictions Counselor, and a licensed mental health counselor and qualified clinical supervisor in the state of Florida. He holds his Ph.D. in counseling and counselor education from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Currently serving as the program director of counselor education and school psychology at the University of Central Florida, in Orlando, Dr. Hagedorn has served on a variety of state, regional and national organizations dedicated to addictions, spirituality and counseling. Over the past 15 years, Dr. Hagedorn has worked in a variety of clinical settings, including private practice, community mental health clinics, inpatient/outpatient hospitals, intensive outpatient programs, and college counseling centers in the areas of his specialties, chemical and process addictions.

A nationally and internationally recognized speaker and author, Dr. Hagedorn has written more than 50 articles and book chapters, has presented more than 130 times at the international, national, regional, state and local levels, and is co-author of the book Counseling Addicted Families. As a former U.S. Marine who has experienced combat himself, Dr. Hagedorn offers an important perspective to help train counselors to effectively engage service members and veterans in the counseling process.

Discussion

Living With What I've Done: Navigating Moral Injury with ACT and Forgiveness Exercises (Part 1)

Upon returning from active duty, service members can experience a host of challenges. Be it reintegrating with loved ones, recalibrating to life outside the combat zone, or struggling with such things as moral injury or self-medicating behaviors, these individuals often have difficulty reaching out for help. Given the military culture of strength, honor and self-discipline, the idea of admitting to a problem is often foreign, which might result in their avoiding treatment. The internalized shame and guilt over actions taken under fire can lead to the phenomenon of moral injury. Increasingly acknowledged as the signature wound of this generation of veterans, moral injury has been likened to a bruise on the soul, leading to lasting impacts on individuals and their families.

Although the development of informed treatment options for moral injury is in its infancy, one option that warrants consideration is acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT). Using mindfulness techniques and self-forgiveness exercises, ACT helps clients to move past their suffering by targeting shame and avoidance behaviors and teaching them to be psychologically flexible—to “live with” what occurred rather than trying to eliminate reality. Presented by a combat-experienced Marine, this two-part webinar will offer the necessary tools to help clinicians implement ACT and forgiveness strategies for their clients who are experiencing moral injury. Part 1 will examine moral injury and the basic tenets of ACT, and Part 2 will explore various mindfulness techniques and self-forgiveness exercises to use with those struggling with moral injury.

Part 1 of this two-part webinar will focus on introducing the problem (moral injury) and a theoretical approach that offers solutions (acceptance and commitment therapy). In exploring moral injury, attendees will:

  • Learn the various definitions and causes;
  • Examine how it differs from PTSD;
  • Review the current treatment options to address it; and
  • Be introduced to suicide risk and protective factors specific to service members.
    • Theoretical principles; and
    • Primary techniques (e.g., mindfulness processes and commitment processes).

Bryce Hagedorn, Ph.D., NCC, MAC, LMHC

Bryce Hagedorn is a National Certified Counselor, a Master Addictions Counselor, and a licensed mental health counselor and qualified clinical supervisor in the state of Florida. He holds his Ph.D. in counseling and counselor education from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Currently serving as the program director of counselor education and school psychology at the University of Central Florida, in Orlando, Dr. Hagedorn has served on a variety of state, regional and national organizations dedicated to addictions, spirituality and counseling. Over the past 15 years, Dr. Hagedorn has worked in a variety of clinical settings, including private practice, community mental health clinics, inpatient/outpatient hospitals, intensive outpatient programs, and college counseling centers in the areas of his specialties, chemical and process addictions.

A nationally and internationally recognized speaker and author, Dr. Hagedorn has written more than 50 articles and book chapters, has presented more than 130 times at the international, national, regional, state and local levels, and is co-author of the book Counseling Addicted Families. As a former U.S. Marine who has experienced combat himself, Dr. Hagedorn offers an important perspective to help train counselors to effectively engage service members and veterans in the counseling process.

Q & ADiscussion

Utilizing Distance Counseling for Rural and Military Populations

The practice of distance counseling has grown in popularity over the past few years, because the application of these technologies has endless possibilities for mental health services. The widespread availability of the Internet gives individuals the ability to seek counseling services from the comfort of their own home. This webinar will examine the practice of distance counseling and the great need to increase the number of mental health practitioners who are trained in this counseling modality. Special emphasis will be on the mental health challenges faced by rural and military populations.

After this session, participants will:

  • Understand the mental health challenges of rural and military populations.
  • Understand a brief history of distance counseling and its effectiveness
  • Understand a brief history of distance counseling and its effectiveness.

Michael Jones, M.A., NCC, DCC, LP

Michael Jones, a 2013 NBCC Minority Fellowship Program (MFP) Fellow, is a licensed professional counselor, National Certified Counselor and Distance Credentialed Counselor. He is a current doctoral candidate in counselor education and supervision at Regent University in Virginia Beach, Virginia. He is also a counseling faculty member at Messiah College in Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania. He received his M.A. in clinical pastoral counseling from Ashland Theological Seminary in Ohio. Mr. Jones’ work experience includes more than 12 years in mental health and pastoral counseling. He frequently presents on a variety of topics at the national, regional and state levels. In addition, he maintains a private practice providing distance counseling, supervision and continuing education for mental health professionals. Mr. Jones' professional research and counseling interests include distance counseling and supervision, ethics, private practice consultations, and multicultural issues.

Q & ADiscussion

Understanding Suicide and Prevention in Service Members

Preventing suicide among service members has been a focus of the Department of Defense (DOD) for many years, particularly in response to an increase of suicides among service members and veterans in the past decade. Prevention and intervention are often discussed in training, but helping counselors understand the mind of a suicidal warrior is an area less frequently addressed. This webinar will focus on helping those who respond to service members in suicidal crisis to understand the thought processes in reaching that point, the challenges to communication between warrior language and mental health language, factors that contribute to suicide among service members, and suicide risk and protective factors unique to this population. This webinar is designed to assist counselors in understanding and developing an effective alliance with the service member in suicidal crisis.

During this session, participants will:

  • Learn about the communication challenges posed by the differences in warrior language and mental health language.
  • Become familiar with the thought processes of a service member that can lead to suicide.
  • Learn to identify specific factors that contribute to a service member’s suicide.
  • Be introduced to suicide risk and protective factors specific to service members.

Mary Bartlett, Ph.D., NCC, LPC

Mary Bartlett holds a master’s degree in counseling from the University of Maryland at College Park and a doctorate in counselor education from Auburn University in Auburn, Alabama. She is a licensed professional counselor in Alabama and a National Certified Counselor, as well as a mental health consultant, researcher and trainer. Currently, Dr. Bartlett is visiting assistant professor of graduate counseling at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and an adjunct therapist at Castlewood at The Highlands Eating Disorder Treatment Center, also in Birmingham. She is a master trainer for the Suicide Prevention Resource Center, and is a qualified master resilience trainer.

Dr. Bartlett is an international speaker and has published research, manuscripts and book chapters in the field of suicide prevention. She has extensive clinical experience in the areas of suicide, resilience and various mental health topics and assists Department of Defense leadership on these matters. Dr. Bartlett has held various faculty and teaching positions throughout Alabama. She is a member of the Academy for Eating Disorders (AED), co-chair of the AED suicide prevention special interest group, a board member of the ethics committee for the International Association of Eating Disorders Professionals, a committee member of the workplace postvention task force of the American Association of Suicidology, and on the advisory board of the Alabama chapter for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.

Q & ADiscussion

Mindfulness: A Promising Intervention for Trauma, ADHD, Depression and Anxiety

In this webinar, counselors will learn about mindfulness meditation as a promising intervention for the treatment of trauma, ADHD, depression and anxiety. The theoretical underpinnings of mindfulness-based interventions will be explored. Specific mindfulness skills for the treatment of the above disorders will be shared. This webinar is the third module in a series of mindfulness webinars. The first two modules, Mindfulness and Counselor Self-Care and Experiencing Mindfulness are currently available for viewing on www.i-counseling.net, under the Building Professional Excellence tab.

After this session, participants will:

  • Be able to identify the theoretical underpinnings of mindfulness-based treatment.
  • Understand how mindfulness can reduce suffering.
  • Understand specific mindfulness tools that can be utilized with clients who struggle with various disorders.

Corinne Zupko, Ed.S., NCC, BCC, LPC

Corinne Zupko is an adjunct professor of counselor education at The College of New Jersey (TCNJ), where she has developed and taught classes focusing on wellness and mindfulness at the graduate and undergraduate levels. She earned her B.A. in psychology from TCNJ, her M.A. in counseling from TCNJ, and her Ed.S. in counseling with a concentration in meditation from Rider University. Ms. Zupko is a licensed professional counselor in New Jersey, a National Certified Counselor and a Board Certified Coach.Ms. Zupko has presented on mindfulness at many professional conferences including the American School Counselor Association and the New Jersey Counseling Association, and she was a recent keynote speaker at the New Jersey Association for Multicultural Counseling. Her interests include the topics of wellness, mindfulness, and spirituality in counseling. Ms. Zupko teaches mindfulness-based stress reduction classes in her community, and has produced a series of five-minute mindfulness meditation recordings for busy people.

Q & ADiscussion

The Science of Well-Being: Positive Psychology Strategies for Increasing Engagement and Strengthening Relationships

This webinar explores engagement and relationships, the second and third pillars of positive psychology. Research has demonstrated that experiential absorption and immersion in specific focused activities can increase creativity, problem-solving and overall well-being. Similarly, the quality of social connections correlates to increased life satisfaction and lower rates of depression, anxiety and insomnia. Participants in this webinar will learn practical strategies that can be used with clients or as personal tools to strengthen engagement and relationships as a means of improving quality of life. Included examples are applicable to educational, military, behavioral health and social service settings.

After this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe two ways that better engagement and relationships benefit clients.
  • Identify two ways to help clients increase engagement.
  • Identify two strategies to strengthen relationships and social connections.

Bob Bertolino, Ph.D., NCC, LPC

Bob Bertolino is associate professor of rehabilitation counseling at Maryville University, senior clinical advisor at Youth In Need, Inc. and senior associate for the International Center for Clinical Excellence. He has taught more than 400 workshops throughout the United States and 11 countries and authored or coauthored 14 books, including The Therapist’s Notebook on Positive Psychology: Activities, Exercises, and Handouts; Strengths-Based Engagement and Practice: Creating Effective Helping Relationships; and Thriving on the Front Lines: Strengths-Based Youth Care Work. Dr. Bertolino is licensed as a marital and family therapist and professional counselor in the state of Missouri and is a National Certified Counselor.

Q & ADiscussion

“There’s Nothing Wrong With Me”—A Culturally Sensitive Approach to Soldiers’ Resistance to Counseling

Upon returning from deployment, service members are likely to experience a host of challenges. Be it reintegrating with loved ones, recalibrating to life outside the combat zone, or struggling with moral injury or self-medicating behaviors, these individuals often have difficulties reaching out for help. Given the military culture of strength, honor and self-discipline, the idea of admitting to a problem is often foreign, which can result in service members avoiding treatment. Therefore, counselors must recognize and honor the unique aspects of military culture in order to both navigate resistance and bolster resiliency. Presented by a former combat Marine, this presentation will offer the necessary tools to connect with service members and veterans.

This presentation will focus on providing counselors with five primary strategies for helping combat-experienced service members. This session will:

  • Explore the training needs for counselors working with this population.
  • Examine counselors’ personal qualities that can either enhance or impede connecting with these clients.
  • Explore the cultural aspects unique to working with service members.
  • Direct counselors to the necessity of self-care, as working with this population can be emotionally taxing.
  • Explore several special considerations for treating service members who have experienced combat in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Bryce Hagedorn, Ph.D., NCC, MAC, LMHC

Bryce Hagedorn is a National Certified Counselor, a Master Addictions Counselor, and a licensed mental health counselor and qualified clinical supervisor in the state of Florida. He holds his Ph.D. in counseling and counselor education from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Currently serving as the program director of counselor education and school psychology at the University of Central Florida, in Orlando, Dr. Hagedorn has served on a variety of state, regional and national organizations dedicated to addictions, spirituality and counseling. Over the past 15 years, Dr. Hagedorn has worked in a variety of clinical settings, including private practice, community mental health clinics, inpatient/outpatient hospitals, intensive outpatient programs, and college counseling centers in the areas of his specialties, chemical and process addictions.

A nationally and internationally recognized speaker and author, Dr. Hagedorn has written more than 50 articles and book chapters, has presented more than 130 times at the international, national, regional, state and local levels, and is co-author of the book Counseling Addicted Families. As a former U.S. Marine who has experienced combat himself, Dr. Hagedorn offers an important perspective to help train counselors to effectively engage service members and veterans in the counseling process.

Q & ADiscussion

Turning Your Manuscript Into an Article: Navigating the Publication Process From Start to Finish

Although all authors hope for journals to accept their manuscripts on the first submission, they often go through a lengthy review and revision process to transform a manuscript into a published article. Presenters will share the nuts and bolts of publishing a manuscript, including finding the right journal and successfully completing revisions to increase the chance of acceptance. Additionally, presenters will provide helpful tips on how to promote multiculturalism, advocacy and social justice through scholarly work.

Moderated by Dr. Atsuko Seto, panelists Dr. Jennifer Cook, Tiffany Hairston and Dr. Robert Horne will help participants learn:

  • How to begin and actually finish a manuscript.
  • How to find a good fit between a manuscript and journals for potential submission.
  • Successful strategies for revising a manuscript and handling rejections.
  • Ways to advocate for underserved populations and address social justice issues through scholarly publications.

Atsuko Seto, Ph.D., NCC, ACS, LPC

Atsuko Seto is associate professor and chair of the Department of Counselor Education at The College of New Jersey, near Trenton. She holds a doctorate in counselor education from the University of Wyoming, in Laramie, and a master's degree in counseling from Chadron State College in Nebraska. Dr. Seto is a licensed professional counselor in New Jersey, a National Certified Counselor (NCC) and an Approved Clinical Supervisor (ACS). She serves as a reviewer for the Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development. Dr. Seto’s strong interest in multiculturalism and diversity in counseling began with her experience studying English as a second language (ESL) in the United States as an international student. Gaining insights into the potential impact of acculturative stressors, language barriers and race relations has fostered both her personal and professional growth while strengthening her commitment to lifelong learning. Dr. Seto’s scholarly activities include publications and presentations in the areas of counseling Asians and Asian Americans, intercultural couples, experiential multicultural counseling activities, and faculty professional development.

Jennifer M. Cook, Ph.D., NCC, LPC

Jennifer M. Cook is assistant professor in the Department of Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology at Marquette University, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. She is a passionate multicultural counselor, educator, supervisor and researcher who infuses advocacy throughout her work. Dr. Cook has served clients, particularly underserved populations, in private practice and clinical mental health settings, and supervised school and clinical mental health counselors-in-training. Her research interests focus on counselor multicultural development, with particular emphasis on issues related to social class and socioeconomic status. Dr. Cook earned her Ph.D. in counselor education from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and was proud to be selected for the 2013 NBCC Minority Fellowship Program.

Tiffany Hairston, M.A., NCC, PC, LICDC

Tiffany Hairston holds a Master of Arts in community counseling from the University of Toledo, where she is currently pursuing her Ph.D. in counselor education and supervision with a research focus on colorism and counseling. She currently works as a clinical coordinator at Unison Behavioral Group. Ms. Hairston is licensed in the state of Ohio as a professional counselor and as an independent chemical dependency counselor with a clinical supervision endorsement. She was selected for the 2013 National Board for Certified Counselors Minority Fellowship Program to increase access to effective, culturally competent counseling services for underserved minority populations. Ms. Hairston has over twelve years of experience in substance abuse counseling and two years in mental health counseling. She has taught courses on a number of substance abuse topics and has presented at the American Counseling Association national conference, Association for Counselor Education and Supervision national conference, Ohio Association for Counselor Education and Supervision conference, and All Ohio Counselors Conference. Her article “Offenders Who Are Mothers With and Without Experience in Prostitution: Differences in Historical Trauma, Current Stressors, and Physical and Mental Health Differences” appeared in Women’s Health Issues.

Robert A. Horne, Ph.D., NCC, LPC, LCAS, CSI

Robert A. Horne holds a Ph.D. in counseling and counselor education from North Carolina State University, a master’s degree in agency counseling from North Carolina Central University, and a Master of Divinity from Duke University’s Duke Divinity School. He is a National Certified Counselor (NCC) and holds licenses in North Carolina as a licensed professional counselor, licensed clinical addiction specialist and clinical supervisor intern. Dr. Horne is a 2013 NBCC Minority Fellowship Program (MFP) Fellow and currently serves as a therapist in private practice. His research focuses on substance use, identity and spirituality among males of African descent. Dr. Horne has experience working with diverse populations and provides mental health and substance use training in multiple countries, including South Africa, Guyana and Jamaica.

Discussion

All About Being a National Certified Counselor

This webinar is intended to offer valuable information to both counselors interested in pursuing professional certification and those who are already nationally certified.

This session will help participants:

  • Understand the roles and functions of professional certification in mental health.
  • Recognize the importance of certification in counselor professional identity.
  • Identify the advantages of certification.
  • Distinguish the different elements of professional certification, including requirements for eligibility, maintenance and recertification, and continuing education standards.

Michelle Gross, M.Ed., NCC, BCC, LPC

Michelle Gross is the certification services director for the National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC). In this capacity, she coordinates all services for the National Certified Counselor (NCC), Certified Clinical Mental Health Counselor (CCMHC), Master Addictions Counselor (MAC) and National Certified School Counselor (NCSC) certifications. In addition, she oversees services for current certificants, such as recertification and continuing education. Ms. Gross earned her master’s degree in counseling from Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Prior to joining NBCC, she worked as a school counselor in the Winston-Salem/Forsyth County school district. She is a National Certified Counselor (NCC), a Board Certified Coach (BCC), and a licensed school counselor and licensed professional counselor (LPC) in North Carolina, and has practiced privately as a counselor with a focus on individuals with AD/HD and other education challenges.

Callie Gordon, M.S., Ed.S., NCC, LPCA

Callie Gordon received her B.A. in psychology and women’s studies from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and her master’s and educational specialist degrees in couple and family counseling at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Ms. Gordon is the continuing education coordinator for NBCC, helping to review and approve continuing education providers across the country to ensure NBCC standards. She also sees clients in private practice, specializing in divorce and families in transition. Outside of counseling, Ms. Gordon enjoys spending time with her husband, son and two rambunctious dogs.

Nikki Yannone, M.S., Ed.S., NCC, LPCA

Nikki Yannone is the community management coordinator for NBCC. She received her B.A. in journalism and advertising from the University of Maine in Orono before moving to North Carolina, where she received her B.A. in psychology and M.S. and Ed.S. in couple and family counseling from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. In addition to working at NBCC, Ms. Yannone works in private practice, providing counseling to individuals and families. She has a strong interest in working with victims of traumatic experiences. In her spare time, Ms. Yannone enjoys arts and crafts; cooking (and eating) good food; and enjoying the outdoors with her husband, Curt, and their dog, Nelli.

Q & ADiscussion

The Science of Well-Being: Positive Psychology Strategies for Increasing Positive Emotion

At the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  • 1. Identify two subcategories of positive emotion.
  • 2. Describe two strategies to increase positive emotion.
  • 3. Describe two ways to increase the likelihood of success with strategies to increase positive emotion.

Presented by: Bob Bertolino Ph.D, NCC, LPC

Bob Bertolino is associate professor of rehabilitation counseling at Maryville University, senior clinical advisor at Youth In Need, Inc. and senior associate for the International Center for Clinical Excellence. He has taught more than 400 workshops throughout the United States and 11 countries and authored or coauthored 14 books, including The Therapist’s Notebook on Positive Psychology: Activities, Exercises, and Handouts; Strengths-Based Engagement and Practice: Creating Effective Helping Relationships; and Thriving on the Front Lines: Strengths-Based Youth Care Work. Dr. Bertolino is licensed as a marital and family therapist and professional counselor in the state of Missouri and is a National Certified Counselor.

Q & ADiscussion

Experiencing Mindfulness

In this session, participants will learn:

  • How to practice various forms of mindfulness meditation as a means of self-care.
  • How to work with a wandering mind.
  • How to apply mindfulness to diverse settings.

Presented by: Corinne Zupko Ed.S., NCC, BCC, LPC

Corinne Zupko is an adjunct professor of counselor education at The College of New Jersey (TCNJ), where she has developed and taught classes focusing on wellness and mindfulness at the graduate and undergraduate levels. She earned her B.A. in psychology from TCNJ, her M.A. in counseling from TCNJ, and her Ed.S. in counseling with a concentration in meditation from Rider University. Ms. Zupko is a licensed professional counselor in New Jersey, a National Certified Counselor and a Board Certified Coach.

Ms. Zupko has presented on mindfulness at many professional conferences including the American School Counselor Association and the New Jersey Counseling Association, and she was a recent keynote speaker at the New Jersey Association for Multicultural Counseling. Her interests include the topics of wellness, mindfulness, and spirituality in counseling. Ms. Zupko teaches mindfulness-based stress reduction classes in her community, and has produced a series of five-minute mindfulness meditation recordings for busy people.

Q & ADiscussion

How to Write Right

Presented by J. Scott Hinkle and Traci P. Collins, at the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe common writing mistakes in journal article submissions.
  • Add key steps before submission to enhance their manuscripts.
  • Describe what the TPC editors are looking for when they review manuscripts.

Traci P. Collins M.S., NCC

Traci P. Collins is the managing editor of The Professional Counselor (TPC), the official journal of the National Board for Certified Counselors. She completed her master’s degree in clinical mental health counseling at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and is currently a doctoral student at North Carolina State University. Ms. Collins is a licensed counselor in North Carolina and a National Certified Counselor (NCC).

J. Scott Hinkle Ph.D, NCC, CCMHC, ACS

J. Scott Hinkle is the director of professional development at NBCC. Dr. Hinkle has authored numerous articles on mental health as well as two books. Dr. Hinkle has been a practitioner for 35 years in the areas of community and school mental health. He also specializes in couples and family counseling, as well as team building and outdoor leadership. Dr. Hinkle has taught graduate courses in family counseling, psychological testing, counseling research and psychodiagnosis in the United States and Europe, and has offered numerous distance education courses online.

Q & ADiscussion

Mindfulness and Counselor Self-Care

At the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  • Define mindfulness.
  • Identify various aspects of wellness.
  • Understand the difference between mindfulness and relaxation.
  • Identify the difference between formal and informal mindfulness practices.
  • Understand research on the effects of mindfulness practices.

Presented by: Corinne Zupko Ed.S., NCC, BCC, LPC

Corinne Zupko is an adjunct professor of counselor education at The College of New Jersey (TCNJ), where she has developed and taught classes focusing on wellness and mindfulness at the graduate and undergraduate levels. She earned her B.A. in psychology from TCNJ, her M.A. in counseling from TCNJ, and her Ed.S. in counseling with a concentration in meditation from Rider University. Ms. Zupko is a licensed professional counselor in New Jersey, a National Certified Counselor and a Board Certified Coach.

Ms. Zupko has presented on mindfulness at many professional conferences including the American School Counselor Association and the New Jersey Counseling Association, and she was a recent keynote speaker at the New Jersey Association for Multicultural Counseling. Her interests include the topics of wellness, mindfulness, and spirituality in counseling. Ms. Zupko teaches mindfulness-based stress reduction classes in her community, and has produced a series of five-minute mindfulness meditation recordings for busy people.

Q & ADiscussion

The Science of Well-Being: An Introduction to Positive Psychology

After the session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe a framework for evaluating well-being.
  • Describe two things that increase long-term happiness.
  • List the five pillars of positive psychology.

Presented by: Bob Bertolino Ph.D, NCC, LPC

Bob Bertolino is associate professor of rehabilitation counseling at Maryville University, senior clinical advisor at Youth In Need, Inc. and senior associate for the International Center for Clinical Excellence. He has taught more than 400 workshops throughout the United States and 11 countries and authored or coauthored 14 books, including The Therapist’s Notebook on Positive Psychology: Activities, Exercises, and Handouts; Strengths-Based Engagement and Practice: Creating Effective Helping Relationships; and Thriving on the Front Lines: Strengths-Based Youth Care Work. Dr. Bertolino is licensed as a marital and family therapist and professional counselor in the state of Missouri and is a National Certified Counselor.

Q & ADiscussion

Recapturing Creativity to Enhance Your Professional and Personal Lives

After the session, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss different types of creativity.
  • Utilize creativity-based exercises to generate ideas.
  • Describe recent research related to creativity.
  • Apply creative techniques to their personal and professional lives.
  • Gain resources in creativity and creative problem-solving.

Presented by: John McCarthy Ph.D, NCC, LPC

John McCarthy loves learning about, talking about and experiencing creativity. As a professor in the Department of Counseling at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, he regularly teaches the course Creative Approaches to Counseling. Dr. McCarthy is a member of the Association for Creativity in Counseling and is the primary author of an upcoming e-book titled Driving Forward in Reverse. A global lecturer, he currently serves as an International Scholar in the Open Society Foundations’ Academic Fellowship Program, working with the psychology program at Tbilisi State University, in the country of Georgia. Dr. McCarthy is also active in volunteering with the NBCC Foundation in his role as chair of the Foundation Ambassadors.

Q & ADiscussion

I’m a Counselor. . . . Now What?

Presented by Melissa Fickling and Mark Eades, this presentation will address:

  • Key issues in the pre–job search, job search, and post–job search stages for community and school counselors
  • How to successfully and efficiently use technology when searching for a counseling position.
  • How to present yourself in the best light to employers in person and on paper.
  • Expectations when shifting from the role of student to peer in the workforce

Melissa J. FicklingM.A., NCC, LPC

Melissa Fickling is a second-year doctoral student in counseling and counselor education at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. She earned her master's degree in community counseling at Roosevelt University in Chicago. She is a National Certified Counselor (NCC) and a licensed professional counselor (LPC). Ms. Fickling has six years of experience providing career counseling to adults in university, community and private practice settings and particularly enjoys talking with new counselors about their career development. She was recently selected as one of eight members of the 2014 class of the National Career Development Association's Leadership Academy.

Mark P. EadesM.A., NCC, LPCA

Mark Eades is a current doctoral student in the Department of Counseling and Educational Development at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and holds a master’s degree in school counseling from Wake Forest University. He is a National Certified Counselor (NCC) and a licensed school counselor and licensed professional counselor associate (LPCA) in North Carolina. Mr. Eades enjoys working with students of all ages and has counseled students from kindergarten through graduate school in a variety of settings. He has a special interest in talking with students about multicultural considerations, family concerns, teacher-student relationships and career-personality matching.

Q & ADiscussion

Viktor Frankl: An Intimate Portrait

Presented by Alexander Vesely, M.A.

Viennese psychiatrist and neurologist Viktor Frankl (1905–1997) is widely considered one of the most influential thinkers of the 20th century. His long-selling account of his experiences in the Holocaust, Man’s Search for Meaning, is among the top 10 most influential books in the United States, as measured by the Library of Congress, and continues to resonate with millions of people around the world. In this account, written shortly after his return to Vienna following the liberation, he depicts the Nazi concentration camp experience not only from a human perspective, but from a psychologist’s perspective.

A student of Sigmund Freud and Alfred Adler, Dr. Frankl early on developed his own theory of “logotherapy,” which examines the question of meaning and what keeps the human mind healthy, rather than analyzing what makes people sick. This approach is continued today by the positive psychology movement, among others.

Alexander VeselyM.A.

Alexander Vesely has directed many short films, commercials and documentaries, but is most proud of his latest work, Viktor & I: An Alexander Vesely Film, based on the life and works of his grandfather, Viktor Frankl, the notable Austrian neurologist, psychiatrist and founder of logotherapy. Viktor & I won several prestigious film awards in the United States, including the diamond award for best documentary at the California Film Awards.

Mr. Vesely is a resident of Vienna, Austria. He holds an M.A. and a B.A in psychotherapeutic science from Sigmund Freud University, in Vienna. He holds the diplomate in logotherapy credential from the Viktor Frankl Institute of Logotherapy in Abilene, Texas, and a diplomate in psychotherapy training from the South German Institute of Logotherapy. In addition, Mr. Vesely is head of the media department and family representative for the Viktor Frankl Institute in Vienna.

Mr. Vesely has been producing films that captivate audiences worldwide for more than 20 years. As a former psychotherapist himself, he believes in a direct connection between psychotherapy and film. His own training in psychotherapy gives Mr. Vesely an advantage as a film director when it comes to understanding human dynamics, especially when interacting with partners, actors, editors, composers and other creative artists.

Q & ADiscussion

Career Counseling and Development Interventions in a Group Setting

Presented by E. Amalia Stanciu, this session will help participants to:

  • Review general characteristics of group counseling.
  • Understand career development needs according to age groups.
  • Examine career counseling and development interventions fit for the needs of several age segments in group settings.

E. Amalia StanciuNCC, ACS, GCDF

E. Amalia Stanciu holds a doctorate in counseling and counselor education from Syracuse University, in New York; a master’s degree in counseling from Wake Forest University, in North Carolina; and a master’s degree in career counseling from Polytechnic University, in Bucharest, Romania. She is business development director for the European Board for Certified Counselors (EBCC). Dr. Stanciu is a National Certified Counselor (NCC), a registered Global Career Development Facilitator (GCDF) International Master Trainer, an Approved Clinical Supervisor (ACS) and a Mental Health Facilitator (MHF) master trainer.

Dr. Stanciu has experience in career counseling in school and business settings, clinical mental health counseling, supervision, research, and counselor education. She holds a strong interest in the development of career counseling in Romania and the rest of Europe. As one of the first Global Career Development Facilitators (GCDFs) in her country of Romania, her doctoral thesis provided the first empirical validation of the GCDF program in Romania.

Discussion

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